How the great North Woods became such a huge tourist attraction—through planning and of course, obstacles in the road.

A party of four women canoeing near an island on Burntside Lake, August 4, 1940. Here, author Aaron Shapiro recalls his own memorable North Woods experiences and elaborates on the efforts and collaboration that went into making the area such a popular tourist destination. (Believe it or not, north-Midwesterners, this weather will be ours once … More How the great North Woods became such a huge tourist attraction—through planning and of course, obstacles in the road.

Why do we have such faith in creativity?

William W. Caudill, “The Busted Box,” New Schools for New Education, 1959, page 21. Despite its abstract nature, the term “creativity” is something of a hot commodity in contemporary educational rhetoric—a reminder of the discourse that flooded the U.S. after World War II. BY AMY F. OGATAAssociate professor at the Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, … More Why do we have such faith in creativity?

On healing, settler colonialism, and Hawaiʻi: How can we use Idle No More’s momentum to push for changes in education?

In The Seeds We Planted: Portraits of a Native Hawaiian Charter School, Noelani Goodyear-Kaʻōpua explores the paradoxes of reasserting Indigenous knowledge within a school system that has historically underwritten settler colonialism. She also asks how Indigenous and settler peoples can work together to unmake settler-colonial logics of elimination and containment. Here, Goodyear-Kaʻōpua comments on ways … More On healing, settler colonialism, and Hawaiʻi: How can we use Idle No More’s momentum to push for changes in education?

Housing and race: More than meets the eye

What is this billboard not asking us to question? BY DIANNE HARRISArchitectural historian and director of the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign At a prominent intersection in my city, a billboard presents the face of a white woman, her furrowed brow and sad eyes conveying a state … More Housing and race: More than meets the eye