Social Death and the Criminalization of Resistance in the California Prison Hunger Strikes

BY LISA GUENTHERAssociate professor of philosophy at Vanderbilt University On July 8, more than 30,000 prisoners across California launched the largest hunger strike in state history. Now, three weeks later, more than 600 prisoners continue to refuse meals, in spite of direct acts of retaliation by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). Hunger … More Social Death and the Criminalization of Resistance in the California Prison Hunger Strikes

Race relations and our everyday lives: An excerpt from Albert Memmi’s "Racism"

The dynamics of race and prejudice in a gated community in Florida resonate throughout the world because they are, in fact, global and human conditions. In Racism, published by the University of Minnesota Press in 2000, sociologist Albert Memmi describes scenes in Paris and in Algeria that share significant similarities to the interactions between Trayvon … More Race relations and our everyday lives: An excerpt from Albert Memmi’s "Racism"

The way scholarship works today

In a blog post for Inside Higher Ed, college librarian Barbara Fister considers University of Minnesota Press director Doug Armato’s January blog post on open access and the future of scholarly publishing alongside a recent statement from the American Historical Society in favor of protecting scholars’ dissertations from public view. Her reaction: What’s especially worth … More The way scholarship works today

How the suburban U.S. shopping mall reimagined the city and undergirded architectural modernization

Victor Gruen’s Southdale Center in Edina, Minnesota, was the first fully indoor shopping mall in the world. Photo credit: Bobak Ha’Eri via Creative Commons. BY DAVID SMILEYGraduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University In 1958, the Architectural League of New York held a photographic exhibit of new street furniture. Today, such an … More How the suburban U.S. shopping mall reimagined the city and undergirded architectural modernization

Hot Spotter’s Report: Imagining alternate possibilities in a world in which toxicity and exposure are not the exception but the rule.

U.S. Department of Energy radiation hot spot detection equipment utilized at Rocky Flats, Colorado. Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy. BY SHILOH R. KRUPARAssistant professor of culture and politics at Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University Growing up near two major plutonium processing facilities (Hanford, WA, and Rocky Flats, CO) … More Hot Spotter’s Report: Imagining alternate possibilities in a world in which toxicity and exposure are not the exception but the rule.

The history of government surveillance in the U.S.: From the dragnet to Prism

In the 1930s, the dragnet came to refer to the use of radio as the key technology to combat criminal mobility.This image from 1935 is of a radio program being recorded at KTAR (AM), Phoenix, Arizona. Source: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. BY KATHLEEN BATTLESAssociate professor of communication and journalism at Oakland University … More The history of government surveillance in the U.S.: From the dragnet to Prism