Where do cultures go when they die? The story of Codfish, the Indian, and the phonograph.

When the Edison phonograph was first made in the 1890s, people used it torecord their own voices. It later became one of the first commercially producedmachines when it was used to play music. It worked by vibrating the stylus up and downwhile moving across the wax cylinder (Hill & Dale method).Image credit: Museum of Technology. … More Where do cultures go when they die? The story of Codfish, the Indian, and the phonograph.

LGBT History Month: A look at behind-the-scenes groundwork that leads to the headline-grabbing victories.

BY RYAN R. THORESON In October 1994, a group of U.S. activists led by Rodney Wilson, a teacher in Missouri, created LGBT History Month. Adopting a strategy pioneered with Black History Month in the 1970s and Women’s History Month in the 1980s, the activists launched the project as a way to ensure the varied and … More LGBT History Month: A look at behind-the-scenes groundwork that leads to the headline-grabbing victories.

Despite that white students are no longer the numerical majority in U.S. schools, racial inequality persists.

BY GILDA L. OCHOAProfessor of sociology and Chicana/o-Latina/o studies at Pomona College Recently, much has been made about census reports that highlight how white students are no longer the numeric majority in U.S. public schools.  Awareness of these changes is important, but statistics on students’ racial demographics tell only part of the story. These demographic … More Despite that white students are no longer the numerical majority in U.S. schools, racial inequality persists.

Let’s have a conversation about U.S. schools that is, ideally, not nice.

What can educators learn from comedians? BY ANGELINA E. CASTAGNOAssociate professor of educational leadership in the College of Education at Northern Arizona University Comedian Louis C.K. has recently made critical comments of Common Core and standardized testing that have lit up the Internet. He did not parse words, nor did he attempt to avoid offending. … More Let’s have a conversation about U.S. schools that is, ideally, not nice.

For military families, the battle for inner peace during deployment is hard-fought.

Lisa Leitz was one of approximately 300 members of Military Families Speak Out in attendance at a September 24, 2005, protest in Washington, D.C., organized by United for Peace and Justice and ANSWER. The groups estimate that up to 500,000 protesters were in attendance. BY LISA LEITZAssistant professor of sociology and director of Project Pericles … More For military families, the battle for inner peace during deployment is hard-fought.

On the challenge of co-existence.

Paul Carter writes about his book Meeting Place, in which waiting, meeting, non-meeting, and communication have possibilities in unexpected manifestations. BY PAUL CARTERRMIT University in Melbourne, Australia Meeting Place is like its subject: where people meet, there are always many voices and views. So Meeting Place brings together stories, insights, beliefs and experiences from many … More On the challenge of co-existence.

“People are born here and only leave here when they die": On forced land eviction in Salvador, Brazil.

View of Gamboa de Baixo, a neighborhood in the Brazilian city of Salvador, Bahia, which is known for its Afro-Brazilian culture and street carnival. It is also known as Brazil’s “capital of happiness.” BY KEISHA-KHAN Y. PERRYAssistant professor of Africana studies at Brown University Gamboa de Baixo is a neighborhoodin the northeastern Brazilian cityof Salvador, … More “People are born here and only leave here when they die": On forced land eviction in Salvador, Brazil.

Listening to students—especially the most marginalized.

BY GILDA L. OCHOAProfessor of sociology and Chicana/o–Latina/o studies, Pomona College Twenty years after I graduated from high school, I returned to a Southern California school as a researcher. On campus, the brick buildings, school bells, lunches, and overall rhythm of the day were familiar. So was the clustering of different students across campus, and … More Listening to students—especially the most marginalized.

Nationalist Heterosexuality and Migrants’ (Il)Legal Status

The Irish asylum process in the early years of the millennium. By Eithne LuibhéidAssociate professor of gender and women’s studies at the University of Arizona At the turn of the millennium, how did the general public come to believe that pregnancy might provide a visible sign that a woman was an undocumented migrant? And how … More Nationalist Heterosexuality and Migrants’ (Il)Legal Status

On healing, settler colonialism, and Hawaiʻi: How can we use Idle No More’s momentum to push for changes in education?

In The Seeds We Planted: Portraits of a Native Hawaiian Charter School, Noelani Goodyear-Kaʻōpua explores the paradoxes of reasserting Indigenous knowledge within a school system that has historically underwritten settler colonialism. She also asks how Indigenous and settler peoples can work together to unmake settler-colonial logics of elimination and containment. Here, Goodyear-Kaʻōpua comments on ways … More On healing, settler colonialism, and Hawaiʻi: How can we use Idle No More’s momentum to push for changes in education?