Anika Fajardo: On searching for identity, exploring origins, and reconciling what family means

BY ANIKA FAJARDO I once went swimming in natural hot springs in Colombia. It was the mid-1990s and Colombia was, according to the U.S. State Department, the most dangerous country on earth. At twenty-one years old, I had just arrived to see my father for the first time since I was a baby. His wife … More Anika Fajardo: On searching for identity, exploring origins, and reconciling what family means

The Big Surreal

BY JOANNA FRUEH Surrealism is an art and literary movement in the early twentieth century. Its best-known work is a painting by Salvador Dali, The Persistence of Memory, in which clocks look like they’re melting in a bleak and blank terrain. In Surrealist painting, distortions of everyday reality, in scale, shape, and space give surreal … More The Big Surreal

Earth Day 2018: Facing the greatest human-rights challenge of our time.

BY SHEILA WATT-CLOUTIER The world has come to know the wildlife of the Arctic more than its people: The Inuit. For two decades my life’s work, which includes elected positions with an international mandate to protect the rights and interests of our people of the circumpolar world, has been to work diligently to put a … More Earth Day 2018: Facing the greatest human-rights challenge of our time.

Linda LeGarde Grover: "Everything that we experience, no matter how small, is a story."

BY LINDA LeGARDE GROVER Here in Duluth, not long after my seventh grandchild was born, I began to write short essays about aspects of Ojibwe contemporary life that link to the joy and gratitude that Ojibwe people have for new life and the continuity of our existence. He is a third-generation child of our extended … More Linda LeGarde Grover: "Everything that we experience, no matter how small, is a story."

"In the United States . . . where such events are always now."

An excerpt from Words to Our Now: Imagination and Dissent by Thomas Glave (2005).Chapter: “(Re-)Recalling Essex Hemphill: Words to Our Now.” It has been said, and we recall: we were never meant to survive. Not here. No, not then or now. Not in the gorge of a grasping empire poisoned by the recurring venoms of … More "In the United States . . . where such events are always now."

Exclusively gay, remarkably famous: The "fabulous potency" of Truman Capote and Gertrude Stein.

BY JEFF SOLOMONAssistant professor of English and women, gender, and sexuality studies at Wake Forest University Truman Capote and Gertrude Stein should not have been famous. Both secured their reputations between the Wilde trials and Stonewall, when the most widely available understandings of homosexuality were inversion and perversion, and when censorship prevented the public discussion … More Exclusively gay, remarkably famous: The "fabulous potency" of Truman Capote and Gertrude Stein.

Looking back: Breast cancer activist Barbara Brenner on cancer wristbands

Barbara Brenner, a key figure in North American breast cancer history, wrote the following piece in 2005 as a Perspective for the San Francisco public radio station KQED. Brenner died in 2013. So Much to Be Done, an anthology of her political and personal writings, has been published by University of Minnesota Press. ——-Anyone who … More Looking back: Breast cancer activist Barbara Brenner on cancer wristbands