Vignettes: 19th-century brothels and the lost history of prostitution on the Minneapolis riverfront.

Penny A. Petersen is author of Minneapolis Madams, the surprising and riveting account of the Minneapolis red-light district in the late nineteenth century and the powerful madams who ran it. In their heyday Minneapolis brothels constituted a substantial economic and political force in the city. Penny digs deep into city archives, newspapers, and other sources … More Vignettes: 19th-century brothels and the lost history of prostitution on the Minneapolis riverfront.

Selena, Jenni Rivera, Eva Garza—meditations on an author’s soundtrack.

Sometimes the act of not listening can chart new territories for Chicano borderlands music. BY DEBORAH VARGASAssociate professor of ethnic studies at the University of California, Riverside The recent unexpected passing of singer Jenni Rivera—born Jenny Dolores Rivera Saavedra in 1969 in Long Beach, California—once again placed the spotlight on histories and experiences of Mexican-American … More Selena, Jenni Rivera, Eva Garza—meditations on an author’s soundtrack.

Occupy Wall Street: A reminder of how radical spatial politics have changed.

The Occupy San Francisco movement in full swing. Jessica Ellen Sewell recalls how just a century ago, women were using spaces elsewhere in the city to campaign for women’s suffrage. BY JESSICA ELLEN SEWELLMember of the School of Social Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey As I was leading a walking … More Occupy Wall Street: A reminder of how radical spatial politics have changed.

Libya’s declared adherence to Sharia law: What does it mean?

This map displays those countries that use Sharia law and to what extent. Here, author Zakia Salime looks at the different interpretations of Sharia law. Image from Creative Commons. BY ZAKIA SALIMEAssistant professor of sociology and women’s and gender studies at Rutgers University Should the West worry about Mustapha Abdul-Jalil’s declaration that Libya shall embrace … More Libya’s declared adherence to Sharia law: What does it mean?

Feature documentary film PINK RIBBONS, INC. seeks a new way to talk about breast cancer

Last October, author Samantha King (Pink Ribbons, Inc.) wrote a blog post for us about the ways in which breast-cancer marketing has now become a year-round industry (What’s next — Pink Cigarettes for the Cure?, Oct. 2010). This year, Pink Ribbons, Inc., has become a feature documentary film by award-winning Quebec filmmaker Léa Pool. The … More Feature documentary film PINK RIBBONS, INC. seeks a new way to talk about breast cancer

New bill shines a light on how the law looks at sex trafficking

A graphic showing global human trafficking patterns, with specific focus on women and children. Julietta Hua discusses a new anti-trafficking law and its implications for mainstream assumptions. Image from Creative Commons. BY JULIETTA HUA Assistant professor of women and gender studies at San Francisco State University With the implementation of Senate Bill 1037 beginning in … More New bill shines a light on how the law looks at sex trafficking

"Glamour" has it wrong; to tackle relationship violence, one must take agency as a victim (and no, the two terms are not mutually exclusive).

A 2008 neighborhood sign reads “North Hampton is a Domestic Violence-Free Zone.” Carisa Showden points out that in situations of relationship violence, agency must be shared with concerned others. Image from Creative Commons. BY CARISA R. SHOWDENAssistant professor of political science at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro In its May 2011 issue, Glamour … More "Glamour" has it wrong; to tackle relationship violence, one must take agency as a victim (and no, the two terms are not mutually exclusive).

Fertile Hysteria: "Desert birthers," "maternity tourism," and the regenerative properties of racialized citizenship

The most recent birth-certificate debate means it’s once again time to evaluate properties of citizenship and the racialized value of American life. Image source. BY RUBY C. TAPIAAssociate professor of comparative studies and women’s studies at The Ohio State University and author of American Pietàs Challenging the rights to U.S. citizenship and the U.S. presidency … More Fertile Hysteria: "Desert birthers," "maternity tourism," and the regenerative properties of racialized citizenship

Lamia Karim: The fall of Muhammad Yunus and its consequences for the women of Grameen Bank.

In 2006 the Grameen Bank of Bangladesh won the Nobel Peace Prize for its innovative microfinancing operations. In March 2011, Grameen Bank founder Muhammad Yunus was ousted as head of the microfinance lender by the Bangladesh government, which owns 25% of the company. The government claims Yunus, 70, is far past its country’s mandatory retirement … More Lamia Karim: The fall of Muhammad Yunus and its consequences for the women of Grameen Bank.